Wisteria Hysteria

The smell of wisteria always reminds me of childhood summers spent at my grandparents’ house, where a huge climber all but covered one side of the house. Now that we live in the house, every time I walk past the plant in full bloom, I always think of my Nana and Grandad, sadly no longer with us.

It is a tremendous plant and possibly in need of a little pruning, though unless something drastic happens to it, I will never have it cut down. It is a dominant feature of the house, providing beautiful fragrance and dramatic colour, and is something so intrinsically entwined with the nature of this house.

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I am going to try to take cuttings from her, as she’s such a glory. There is a trellis attached to the other side of the window, where I believe there was once a clematis, though the bad weather has probably done for that. I do like clematis so I’d like to get a new one to replace it.

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February seedlings

In January you will remember I was exceedingly over-excited because I bought a heated propagator and sowed seven lots of seeds inside.

All in a row

I should have popped it on a south-facing windowsill for maximum light however while the little bedroom window is south-facing the room is in constant use and I have a pair of cats that just love jumping in windows and knocking things off. I had visions of soil being splattered all over washing drying on the airer, so instead I used the back bedroom. This room is a bit of a building site however it is a warm room and relatively light.

I’ve only turned the propagator on for the coldest of nights. We’ve had a couple of nights below freezing. Otherwise the ambient temperature in the room is decent enough that I’ve saved my electricity bill.

Tomato – Moneymaker
Little seedlings

I’ve been rewarded so far! The only thing that isn’t coming yet are the fuchsia. I’ve never grown fuchsia from seed before so not sure what to expect. The antirrhinum are taking their time too; there’s one seedling thus far.

I’m quite impressed with the tomatoes, considering they were a packet of seeds I just found, lying around, barely in date. They are going to get a bit leggy if I’m not careful.

I found a fab blog here which has some wonderful hints and tips for solving problems with seedlings. I’ve subscribed to Family Food Garden email updates and have learnt a lot!

This is my first year growing flowers from seed – I’ve done it lots of times with vegetables but not with flowers. If it doesn’t work out, I know I can buy plug plants relatively cheaply, but I just need to keep an eye on things. I would feel a lot of pride knowing I made a hanging basket that was 100% filled with plants I grew from seed. Even better if I sold them to people!

Yesterday Scott said the cats had got into the back bedroom and had a right time of it. They’re obsessed with a shut door and because I pop in and out of there to check on my seedlings they’re then very interested. Luckily they haven’t wrecked my seedlings or I think I’d be screaming.

I’ve done another order with Sarah Raven and have finally started getting my vegetable seeds ordered. I need to complete my Dobies order as well and then hopefully that will be it for seeds for this year. Then the fun growing part can start!

January seemed to drag and it’s still cold and frosty in February. My sweet peas haven’t done anything in the summer house yet and I’m wondering if they’re too cold. I have a few more seeds to sow and pop on a warm windowsill too, including successional sowings of all that’s in my propagator currently, so I’ll have to go to my mum and dad’s to fetch some of the propagators from there. I’m far too impatient at this time of year! I just want things to get started! I’m sure I’m not alone with gardener’s impatience?

Happy growing chaps! How are your seeds coming along?

2018 – The Year of the Garden

For the past week or so I’ve been trying to write a post about my goals and resolutions for 2018. I’ve either lost interest halfway through or else got to the end and thought nobody will want to read this. That’s fair enough, because I do believe resolutions are very personal things, and shouldn’t be taken lightly. I also think they’re not really relevant to anybody except those that they directly affect. So instead I’m going to write my Gardening Goals for this year, and try to bring my blog back to a more horticulture orientation, like it was in the beginning.

Garden planners

I’ve just made my first seed order of 2018. Last year I didn’t do much at all, other than nursing a dream. So this year I’m going to bypass the dream part and make it a reality! I’ve ordered a selection of January-sowing bedding plants and cut flowers. For a while we’ve talked about selling bedding plants and bunches of cut flowers; I’ve also thought about making and selling hanging baskets and containers. Out of all the things I do, I’ve found making up hanging baskets is the most peaceful, enjoyable way to spend half an hour.

For the past two years I’ve made hanging baskets for home and they’ve done so well with very minimal outlay and input. Now that we’re in a bigger house, there’s more wall space for more baskets! My mum has six baskets up in summer and I’d like that many too. I must say, my mother is the queen of hanging baskets, and she taught me how to do mine.

In the new house we have a decent-sized summer house. Other than housing a lot of riff-raff, it is a waste of space. I wanted to grow plumbago like in the Conservatory at Scampston Walled Garden, but I also want to turn it into a potting shed/greenhouse. It is fairly sheltered, having three mostly covered walls. I made these containers for my Nana for Christmas, and still have some bits left over.

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Last year I thought it might be nice to make hanging baskets and sell them, but something always got in the way. So this year, I’m just going to skip the excuses, and get down to it! I’m going to give growing my own bedding plants and hanging basket plants myself a go, and see if I can make up planters and pots as well as hanging baskets. I would also like to grow cutting flowers, mainly for home and to give as gifts, but possibly to sell bunches of if I have a big stock of them. I will get back into vegetable growing, but even if I just grow enough for home, I’ll be happy with that.

Things to do

Order January-sowing seeds – I did have a little heart attack when DT Browns said they were having a delay on posting seeds out, so hopefully they will come soon! I’ve drawn up an extensive list to order from Mr Fothergill’s as well. Dobies haven’t delivered my catalogue yet, and they are my seed merchant of choice. I’ve set a limit on spending (for this month anyway!) as I can see I’ll get carried away.

Tidy up summer house – this might be a bigger task than first envisaged, as it is full of a lot of junk from the house, but even if I can just make a nice corner to work in. Structurally it’s sound – my Grandad knew what he was doing when he built things. I have my Gardener’s World calendar to hang up, plus I think this will be the home for my whiteboard.

Look at shelves and greenhouse heating – my idea is to have shelving by the glass and also at the back in the shade. With it being still a bit cold in winter, I’m contemplating whether a heater will be a sensible investment. Pay day is still a while off and I’m probably spending what pennies I might have left for that on seeds. Mum did say she has a little paraffin heater so I might play with that.

Equipment – I need to get module trays and pots all washed and cleaned, and also some compost and vermiculite procured from somewhere. I could also do with some decent gloves; my last pair got wrecked up at the farm and the ones I’m using at the moment are definitely more your “decorative” sort.

Vegetable patches – at my mum and dad’s I have a greenhouse and two forlorn vegetable patches. The greenhouse needs cleaning and ideally disinfecting, and the raised beds need digging over with some manure. Handily I know there are great big piles of manure led over the summer so I might need to ask dad if he doesn’t mind me filling the quad trailer with shit. It’s a long way to go with a wheelbarrow.

Order vegetable seeds – in all my excitement about flower seeds, I haven’t actually done any vegetable seed ordering! I’ve made a list of what I want to grow, mainly up at my mum and dad’s. At least now we all live in the same village so I can just walk there. I might even get a bicycle!

Business stuff – it might be a bit early, but I suppose it can’t hurt to be thinking about a name and a logo, if I want to really make a go of it. I’ve already had ideas about logos. I might go down the route of Facebook groups and word-of-mouth stuff first, and see how we get on with stock and the market kitchen idea before going to any larger scale.

Think ahead! – this is always a biggie. I think problems in the past have stemmed from either over-excitement in the beginning leading to burn out, or else not planning correctly. Even though I’m working full time, helping Scott on the farm, doing a house up and trying to finish my book, I still have this deranged idea of devoting time to growing stuff. The best thing I can do is plan my time accordingly, and think ahead. So while I’m sorting out January sowing and setting everything up, I need to think about what to sow in February and March, what can go where, what my space will be like.

So keep checking back, or sign up for updates, to see how my progress is going!

The Liebster Award

I was very kindly nominated for the Liebster Award by the very lovely ohevie, see the original post here!  Now I’ve heard about Liebster before but only because I’ve seen the logo on other blogs, and I always thought there was no chance I’d ever be nominated for an award! We were on our way back from picking up two half-ton bags of barley for the cattle when I got the notification, so safe to say I was very pleased! Now it has been months and months since I was nominated, but I’ve only been able to do a little bit at a time. But now I’m done!
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Don’t give up the daydream

You’ve heard the old saying. Somebody does something stupid, or funny, or badly, and you go, “Don’t give up the day job”. And usually it’s comic effect – haha, we all laugh, how funny, and go about our merry way. Because silly Sandra never really planned on being a professional juggler, or an impressionist, or whatever. She’s quite happy doing whatever it is she’s doing.

But I’m here as the advocate of daydreams – and their bigger, badder cousin, The Dream. Because I have A Dream (a song to sing…) and I’m sure as hell not giving up on it.

Continue reading “Don’t give up the daydream”

Reflections from the farm

A million years ago, I started this blog with the catchy title of notmuchofayoungfarmer. This was a play on words because I was a member of our local Young Farmers’ group, lived on a farm, and knew diddly squat about farming. It’s one of those commonly-known but never spoken of truths that if you join Young Farmers and aren’t an avid tractor man or a shepherd, it’s a way of meeting the opposite sex. I went along to the meetings, got roped into stock judging, and then life caught up with me, and I was doing a Masters and working in Hull, and it just didn’t compute. So I sacked Young Farmers off and embarked on an ill-fated quest to become a teacher. That didn’t last long either.

Hmm. Seeing a trend…

Moving swiftly on!

My blog was to be a support for my writing. However by a stroke of luck or fate or whatever, I find that I’ve boxed up my court shoes and smart skirt suits and have swapped them for wellies and jeans covered in mud. Looks like I’m back to being a Young Farmer, and probably too old to rejoin.

I still don’t know anything about farming, but I now know what a tup is, and what it means when the sheep in the fields have coloured bottoms, and I’m starting to get my head around the different breeds of cows, and when it’s correct to say cow and not something else.

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Personal highlights from the farm include:

  • Getting stuck halfway up Grimston hill in a pickup without diesel, and then being rescued by some kindly gentlemen in a white van – whoever you are, thank you!
  • Also that same week, locking my car keys in the boot and having to bang on doors until a kindly family down the road let me use their phone! It’s a bugger when there’s no phone signal.
  • Seeing our Angus heifer calve to a beautiful baby Hereford x! I think that’s the first thing I’ve seen brought into the world before my very eyes, and by the time we’d got there she’d done most of it herself. She’s a grand little calf with real stunning markings.
  • Bucket-feeding our other three calves and now they’re weaned off and are big strong lads.
  • Getting our tractor! She’s a Case International and is a little nippy four wheel drive thing which suits us just fine, though I do bang my head on every piece of metal in the cab.

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It is hard. I’m only little and not particularly strong, and while I am getting a bit stronger, I still struggle to lug 25kg bags of feed about. And before we got the tractor, it was bloody hard work getting bails of straw and hay down off the great piles for the cattle with just us two, a fence post for leverage and the pickup for the most stubborn bails. And let’s be honest, when you’re chopping fodder beet in the pouring rain and Arctic blast, it’s not that fun. I get muddy by just looking at the yard, my car stinks of mucky wellies, and my arms ache for days, but when everything’s fed and watered, and bedded up, and the yard is blissfully quiet, and the little calf is bouncing around her mother, it isn’t a bad place to be at all.

I will update with more of our adventures as they come.

Katy